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20130103
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
and have enormous problems, but i don't think i've ever met someone who was a totally dark energy that had no humanity or sense of love or affection for anything in their life. that's very rare. but i think that as human beings we tend to compartmentalize, and we have a selective morality based on the situation we're in. and i think that's a very modern thing. it's a problem we have and that we cheat on our taxes and maybe we have a mistress on the side, but in this other area we're totally honest and straightforward and have a moral point of view that is consistent, and we think that's okay. but the moral decisions we make in one part of our life resonate through everything, and i think that's a lot of what we're talking about in this film as well. tavis: the characters are not the same, i want to be clear about that, but i was fascinated to go back through your corpus of work and i think i knew this, but i had forgotten it. you famously turned down the gordon gekko character, michael douglas played that. >> everyone asks me about that. first of all, no one could have done this better tha
thing, you can channel something. you can channel an energy that sometimes is only stirred up by some material or some story that you are exposed to, and it's that process of actually walking in those shoes. you read a good book, it changes your life. now imagine going out and living it. it's like -- and the idea as well that i love that responsibility. i love being part of a group that really loves something together. you've got something to hold up. it's a good pressure. tavis: so "twilight," as you know, is out, and as i said again, breaking records everywhere. but life goes on for kristen stewart, and the new project is called "on the road," and you might want to check it out. first in l.a. and new york, and then wide release. >> yup. tavis: i'm honored to have you here. i enjoyed this immensely. >> oh, yeah, me too, thanks. tavis: thanks for coming on. you good? >> yeah, i'm good. are you good? tavis: you're good. yeah, no. >> all right, sweet. tavis: so we're both good. >> [laughter] yeah. tavis: good. that's good. [laughter] thanks for watching. as always, keep the faith. >> sh
basically take photons and hit a sensor that would turn the photon impulses, the energy of the photons, instead of hitting film, would hit a sensor, and instead of a chemical reaction happening, you would basically get ones and zeros you'd get a value for a color, red, green, or blue. so we're just kind of talking about here's some light, we've got some film, and we just process it and then we'd project it and we'd watch a movie. now we're talking about sunlight hitting a sensor and going to ones and zeros into a box, and we take that box and then we project that, and now we're watching a movie. tavis: so another one of these technological advances. >> yes. tavis: you paused when you said yes, and i want to dig into that. i ask is it really a technological advance. obviously, it could be argued in some ways that it is advancing us. but is it causing challenges in other ways? >> well, it's an industry shift, so practically, it's like what is the role of the cinematographer in making a movie now? he used to be in control of the image. he was the magician. he knew how to do just dealing
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)